Movies bring us the myth that everyone in law enforcement is born deadly, and further trained as crack shots and in ancient, mysterious martial arts, capable of dealing destruction to any bad guy of any size with the flick of a finger. Movies are great that way.

Movies bring us the myth that everyone in law enforcement is born deadly, and further trained as crack shots and in ancient, mysterious martial arts, capable of dealing destruction to any bad guy of any size with the flick of a finger.  Movies are great that way.  

Folks in law enforcement are just regular people who’ve chosen a career path.  To get there they train in a variety of different skills, self-defense being one skill.  But “train” carries the notion of regular practice, as one would the piano or cord progressions on a guitar or any other skill that is perishable without practice.  What they receive is an introduction to self-defense skills and folks in law enforcement, and virtually any other career, benefit with at least an introduction. 

Last Thursday and Friday, Jan. 17 and 18, Ryan Arndt and ATA Martial Arts, in conjunction with Go2FirearmSafety.com, hosted a training seminar for law enforcement personnel, school personnel, and interested people, and over the weekend they held two private trainings for two organizations.  The training centered around active shooter scenarios, and started with basic hand-to-hand defense, moving into knife and gun defense, gun retention, and finally ground defense.

“Chad Engen brings his kids here to my classes,” said Arndt.  “I’m a Go2FS trainer, and he asked if this, the active shooter training, was something I could do here.  I put him in contact with Todd, and here we are today.”

The lead trainer for the training was Todd Droege, from Go2FS.  Droege is from Georgia, and works with police departments there and all over the country.  “We started this, Go2FirearmSafety a few years ago in response to calls for more training,” Droege said.  “Go2 the company has been around for more than twenty years training people in self-defense.  I’ve been in martial arts since I was nine, and picked up krav maga in 2001.  Obviously, you need more than one session.  Training should be ongoing.  But these sessions give participants an idea of what kinds of defense are available.”

The highlight of Thursday’s training was the donation of two tactical vests to the Devils Lake Police Department from Arndt and Droege at Go2FS.

“You can never have too much training,” said Joe Knowski, DLPD chief.  “Honestly, I had little to do with this.  Chad came to me with the idea, and I said run with it.  He’s the one who put it all together.”