Word traveling around has Devils Lake with open water, thin ice, water and thin ice, and ice thick enough to drive on—vehicle size unspecified.

Word traveling around has Devils Lake with open water, thin ice, water and thin ice, and ice thick enough to drive on—vehicle size unspecified.

“There is no open water that I’ve heard of or seen for myself,” said Steve Nelson, Ramsey County Sheriff.  “Obviously you want to use common sense.”

One of the reports out there was open water on Six Mile Bay.  “No, there’s no open water,” said Nelson.  “This weather had ice melting and there was water on the ice, but there’s no open water.  There may be some thin spots and there are a lot of pressure ridges on the lake, especially the main lake, but that’s where you have to use common sense.  If you’re unsure, drill test holes.  And remember, you can be on 15 inches of ice but move 10 yards and it could be only three inches.  Be smart and use common sense.”

Nelson said he’s heard of ice thicknesses between 10 and 15 inches.  “Not thick enough  for a pickup, but enough for a four-wheeler or side-by-side.  I’ve heard of a lot of them going out on the ice.”

“Some of the smaller lakes to the north have a little better ice,” said Nelson, “because they froze first, but you still need to use common sense and be smart.  I’ve seen people in the past standing right on the edge of the ice, right next to the open water under a bridge, and use a casting rod.  I don’t consider that real smart.”

A call to Woodland Resort produced a similar report.  The main lake is one area fisherman may want to stay off of because there are huge pressure ridges and are too dangerous to cross.  The ice is about 13 inches thick, and solid enough for ATVs to drive around on.  “You might want to leave the one-tons off the lake,” they said.