NEAR THE STANDING ROCK SIOUX RESERVATION, N.D. (AP) — An American Indian tribe's attempt to halt construction of an oil pipeline near its North Dakota reservation failed in federal court Friday, but three government agencies asked the pipeline company to "voluntarily pause" work on a segment that tribal officials say holds sacred artifacts.

NEAR THE STANDING ROCK SIOUX RESERVATION, N.D. (AP) — An American Indian tribe's attempt to halt construction of an oil pipeline near its North Dakota reservation failed in federal court Friday, but three government agencies asked the pipeline company to "voluntarily pause" work on a segment that tribal officials say holds sacred artifacts.

The Standing Rock Sioux, whose cause has drawn thousands to join their protest, had challenged the Army Corps of Engineers' decision to grant permits at more than 200 water crossings for the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline. Tribal leaders say the project violates several federal laws and will harm water supplies. The tribe also alleges that ancient sites have been disturbed during construction.

U.S. District Judge James Boasberg in Washington denied the tribe's request for a temporary injunction in a 58-page opinion.

But a joint statement from the Army and the Departments of Justice and the Interior asked the pipeline builder, Energy Transfer Partners, to "voluntarily pause" work on the disputed segment while the government reconsiders "any of its previous decisions" on land that borders or is under Lake Oahe. The statement also said the case "highlighted the need for a serious discussion" about nationwide reforms "with respect to considering tribes' views on these types of infrastructure projects."

Read more about this in Monday's Devils Lake Journal