“Yes,” said Allyson. “There was bone and flesh on the gun and in the barrel.”
“It's on the video,” said Marla. “There's eight seconds of video that shows the last five seconds of my son's life.”
The video was from the dashcam of a Highway Patrol vehicle that showed up in response to the original call. In her statement, Marla thanks that HP office for showing up when he did. “It happened so fast,” she said, “they had to slow the video down frame by frame. But it's all there.”
“No,” said Allyson, “We haven't seen it yet. They won't show it to us yet.”
“The investigator told us,” said Terry, “the BCI investigator. He came over here and told us what happened; that Danny was pistol-whipped; that he was shot in the back of the head...

July 5, 2018, Danny Fuller was shot and killed by an officer of the Devils Lake Police Department.  Danny Fuller was twenty-six years old.

The Fuller family was gathered on the back deck at Terry and Marla’s, Danny’s parents, last Thursday evening.  Marla read a hand-written statement summarizing what has happened since that day in July and their hope for justice.  “We had our lives taken from us,” said Terry after a moment.  “My boy was murdered by the Devils Lake Police.  He was murdered by that cop.”

The Fuller family abided by the request of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation at the outset of the investigation into the killing and didn’t talk to the press, or anyone for that matter.  “They asked us to wait,” said Allyson Bartlett, Danny’s sister.  “It was an ongoing investigation and the investigator asked us to wait until it was over to talk.”

“Danny was shot in the back of the head,” said Terry.  “He was pistol-whipped three times before being shot in the back of the head.  He was executed by that cop.  They had to take the gun for DNA evidence.”

“Yes,” said Allyson.  “There was bone and flesh on the gun and in the barrel.”

“It’s on the video,” said Marla.  “There’s eight seconds of video that shows the last five seconds of my son’s life.”

The video was from the dashcam of a Highway Patrol vehicle that showed up in response to the original call.  In her statement, Marla thanks that HP office for showing up when he did.  “It happened so fast,” she said, “they had to slow the video down frame by frame.  But it’s all there.”

“No,” said Allyson, “We haven’t seen it yet.  They won’t show it to us yet.”

“The investigator told us,” said Terry, “the BCI investigator.  He came over here and told us what happened; that Danny was pistol-whipped; that he was shot in the back of the head.  He told us that the other cop dropped to the ground because he thought he’d been shot.  He said it’s all there in the video.  When they finally give it to me it’s going viral.  Everybody will see my son was executed.”  He pointed to a spot at the top of his forehead.  “There was still an depression right here that matched the outline of a gun butt.  You could see it at the funeral.”

“When we met with the coroner,” said Allyson, “she went over the autopsy report.  She never mention the pistol-whipping.  She just kept talking about his alcohol level.  I guess she thought we couldn’t read.”

“It was all right there in the report,” said Corey, Allyson’s husband.  “The indentations on the head, the burn from the gun barrel.  But all the coroner did was talk about his alcohol level and some abrasions on his knuckles.”

“He was a carpenter,” said Terry.  “And they were a week old.”

“Yeah,” said Corey.  “But none of that seemed to matter to her.  All that mattered, all that she talked about was how much alcohol he had in his system, and if that were justification.  She never once mentioned the pistol-whipping.”

“And that cop hit him so hard,” said Terry, “that it made the magazine eject.  The investigator said you can see it fly out.  We were told, and there were witnesses, that Danny was sitting on the ground with his hands out.  He was surrendering when those to cops got there.  And they beat him and killed him.”

“And they weren’t wearing bodycams,” said Allyson.  “Why?”

“On the news they said they were turned off,” said Terry.  “Of course they were turned off—they weren’t wearing any!  Thank God that Highway Patrolman pulled in when he did.”

The whole investigation, said the Fuller family, is taking so long, and that is troubling to them.  They believe if all of this evidence has been known since the day of the shooting, an answer, for them that means an indictment, should be known by now.  What they fear the most is that nothing will be done, and that this will just go away.  Or, that the state’s attorney will decide to prosecute.  They also can’t believe that the BCI invoked Marcy’s Law to protect the identity of the officer involved.

“He’s not the victim,” said Marla.  “Danny was the victim.  We’re the victims.”

Marla questioned, in her statement, the possible prosecutorial prejudice the Ramsey County State’s Attorney possesses.  She, and the family, wonders if a fair and just outcome is possible.

“Danny’d had trouble with the law before,” said Terry, “and I know the state’s attorney didn’t like him.  When I asked her if she was going step aside she said, no, that Danny’s problems were separate from this.  I think that’s BS.  I think any trial needs to be held somewhere else for Danny to get justice.  Not in this town.  Not with this police department.  Not with this state’s attorney.”

“I have a friend in the apartments that overlooks the area where Danny was killed,” said Marla.  “She said she sees Terry come to that spot every morning.”

“There’s still bone there.  There was blood and flesh.  That’s how this town thought of my son.  Just left parts of him there.

“But I go there every morning,” Terry continued.  “I go to there and then to the cemetery every morning before I go to work.  Danny’d better get justice.  That’s all I’m saying.  He’d better get justice.”

The results of the BCI’s investigation should be released this week.  Last Friday, investigators from the BCI, the state’s attorney, the Attorney General, and the DLPD met.