Sons of Jacob cemetery, the final resting place of many Jewish homesteaders who settled in the Garske area in the the early 1880s, is being considered by the State Historical Society to join the National Register of Historic Places.

Sons of Jacob cemetery, the final resting place of many Jewish homesteaders who settled in the Garske area in the the early 1880s, is being considered by the State Historical Society to join the National Register of Historic Places.

Commissioner Lucas Wakefield offered to draft a letter in support of the cemetery’s placement in the national register, while also offering to travel to Bismarck to advocate for the recognition at a Jan. 27 meeting of the Historical Society.

According to the Sons of Jacob website, “the earliest Jewish settlers of the Garske Colony were two brothers-in-law, Morris Kohn and Herman Kaufmann, who emigrated from a wine district in Hungary after a plague wiped out their vineyards.”

Though those initial settlers moved from the region, other members of the colony stayed in the region for decades.