have you read? The 2018 October  North Dakota Outdoors magazine is available FREE online right now here. You'll find ND Game and Fish Director Terry Steinwand's column Matters Of Opinion inside the cover You've heard us here at the Game and Fish Department talk time and again about the importance of having quality wildlife habitat […]

have you read?

The 2018 October  North Dakota Outdoors magazine is available FREE online right now here.

You'll find ND Game and Fish Director Terry Steinwand's column Matters Of Opinion inside the cover

You've heard us here at the Game and Fish Department talk time and again about the importance of having quality wildlife habitat on the landscape.
Without adequate habitat on the landscape, for example, animals struggle to battle the harsh winter conditions that are often familiar in North Dakota. Without good habitat, animals take much longer to rebound after months of snow and cold.

 

Ron Wilson wrote:  Program Improves Deer Habitat

In 2015, following back-to-back deer gun seasons when fewer than 50,000 licenses were made available to hunters " something not seen in North Dakota in about 35 years " lawmakers made it possible for hunters to help improve wildlife habitat that would favor the state's deer population.

In a bill that unanimously passed in both the House and Senate during the 2015 legislative season, unsuccessful applicants in North Dakota's deer gun lottery could for the first time in 2016 donate their refunds to the Game and Fish Department's Private Land Open To Sportsmen program.

Ron Wilson, Scott Gangl, Dave Fryda and Russ Kinzler collaborate to answer  Questions about Sakakawea's Salmon Program  Chinook salmon were stocked in Lake Sakakawea in 1976, less than a decade after the reservoir filled, to inhabit the deep coldwater environment not used by other fish species. This nonnative species, like other fish in the Missouri River System, has ridden the ups and downs of low- and high-water years, times of abundant forage and times when prey was tougher to come by.

It hardly seems that back-to-back years are nearly the same. The same goes for fishing for salmon in the state's biggest reservoir.