The 2017 October North Dakota Outdoors magazine is available FREE online right now here. North Dakota Game  and Fish Director Terry Steinwand  writes Matters of Opinion   It's a busy time of year in North Dakota's outdoors. By the time this magazine is printed and mailed to subscribers, the echoes of the first shotgun blasts, [...]

The 2017 October North Dakota Outdoors magazine is available FREE online right now here.

North Dakota Game  and Fish Director Terry Steinwand  writes Matters of Opinion  

It's a busy time of year in North Dakota's outdoors.

By the time this magazine is printed and mailed to subscribers, the echoes of the first shotgun blasts, signaling the state's pheasant opener, will have faded.

I'm hoping that hunters went in to the pheasant season with reasonable expectations, considering bird numbers are down in many areas following a difficult winter, drought and an altered landscape.

Ron Wilson North Dakota Outdoors editor with a feature on the Partnership to Benefit Producers, Wildlife

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department has partnered with Pheasants Forever and four county soil conservation districts to help producers farm more efficiently and profitably by offering conservation practices on less gainful crop acres.According to a Pheasants Forever news release, the foundation of the precision agriculture planning partnership is built on the technology of AgSolver's Profit Zone Manager software platform, which focuses on the producer's return-on-investment.

North Dakota Outdoors editor Ron Wilson examines the biology of Managing Sakakawea's Salmon Populaton

 

There are 1.5 million reasons fisheries biologists will slowly navigate Lake Sakakawea's shallow waters this month.

That's roughly the number of chinook salmon eggs North Dakota Game and Fish Department fisheries personnel aim to collect to produce hundreds of thousands of smolts that, months later, will be released back into the big lake.

Last fall, for example, biologists spawned 683 mature females and collected nearly 1.8 million eggs. After sharing some with South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks, fisheries biologists here stocked about 430,000 salmon smolts into Sakakawea in 2017.