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Devils Lake Journal - Devils Lake, ND
  • Tribal research symposium a success

  • Guest speaker Dr. Ed Galindo, emphasized how environmental research brought him closer to his native roots Friday, at the second annual tribal research symposium at Cankdeska Cikana Community College (CCCC) in Spirit Lake.
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  • Guest speaker Dr. Ed Galindo, emphasized how environmental research brought him closer to his native roots Friday, at the second annual tribal research symposium at Cankdeska Cikana Community College (CCCC) in Spirit Lake.
    “Native people have always been scientists,” the associate director of the Idaho space grant said. “I’m using the out(doors) as a classroom.”
    CCCC president Dr. Cynthia Lindquist said the  two-day symposium reflected collaboration, as several institutions contributed to the event.  “Research is really the foundation for addressing problems and issues,” said Lindquist. “It gives students different perspectives, different views.”
    “The other thing this forum showcases is the research that is happening right now, conducted by our faculty and our students,” said Lindquist. “It is so broad, so far-reaching. It’s all   science-based but there’s also many things culturally-related and community-based.”
    Local student Piagan McKay presented a research board on the detoxification of mercury in northern pike, rainbow trout and salmon. “It deals with a Native American diet and helps with the ecosystem,” she said.
    Furthermore, keynote speaker  Galindo said “I think that’s what we have forgotten because we’re used to these walls, and more used to these gizmos that we run with our thumbs. We forget about our true teachers outside: the wind, rain, sun. Nature.”
    Galindo, a faculty member in biology and physics at the University of Idaho, has mentored and learned from youth and tribal people of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes for many years.
    A Yaqui indian, the research Galindo presented Friday, addressed specific needs of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes in Idaho, particularly beaver and salmon populations which provide ecological sustainability and represent spiritual significance.
    The 57-year-old said self-sufficiency is something native people have always practiced. “They took only what they needed … But you’re going to have to learn how to grow food wherever you’re at.”  
    Correspondingly, Galindo is figuring out how to take tilapia and trout eggs to outer-space, with a group of students at University of Idaho. “I hope the youth know there is a lot to do in the world,” said the science-buff.  
    “They are young and bright and ask good questions. We need that, we need people to take action,” he said. “I know there’s plenty to do. It’s whether you want to or not. So come join us. We have the whole world as our classroom.”
    Other participating institutions in the symposium included: Turtle Mountain Community College, Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College, Sitting Bull College, United Tribes Technical College, University of North Dakota and North Dakota State University.
    Page 2 of 2 - syoung@devilslakejournal.com
    For photos and videos from this event go to our website, www.devilslakejournal.com
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