Four Devils Lake residents enjoyed the “trip of a lifetime” in November.



































 


Four Devils Lake residents enjoyed the “trip of a lifetime” in November.
Jim Kienast, Rodger Haugen and Duane and Myrna Tabert went on an 8-day trip to China, which was sponsored by the North Dakota Chamber of Commerce.
Chamber organizations in several states sponsored the trips over the past number of months, according to Kienast.
“I?saw a pamphlet after a talk at our Rotary meeting one day and looked it over,” says Kienast.
“I’d recommend it to anyone if it comes up again.”
The four Devils Lakers flew out of Los Angeles on Nov. 5 for  Beijing.
It was a trans-Pacific flight in a wide-cabin jetliner that crossed the International Dateline.
Upon arrival in the capital of China, they were met by their tour guide, transferred to the hotel, visited Tian An Men Square, the largest in the world, and the Temple of Heaven.
The Palace Museum, also known as the Forbidden City, home of 24 emperors with 9,999 rooms, and the Summer Palace were on the sightseeing list.
The Summer Palace, was known for significant sites such as the Long Corridor with painted gallery, Kunming Lake, Longevity Hill, Seventeen-Arch Bridge and Marble Boat.
Next on the agenda was a tour bus excursion to the Great Wall of China, 4,000 miles long and 2,000 years old.
“We expected the weather to be a little cool, but it was actually quite warm,” explained Kienast.
The tourists took an Air China flight to Shanghai the next day, then a bus trip to Suzhou.
They visted the Lingering Garden, Tiger Hill and Hanshan Temple. Then it was on to the National Embroidery Institute to see silk embroidery, an important local craft with thousands of years of history.
It was followed up by an evening dinner show of traditional Chinese music.
A tour bus took them to Hangzhou to visit the Economic Development Zone and the centuries old Lingyin Temple with a camphor-wood carved Buddha, over 64 feet tall.
The next day included a morning boat cruise on West Lake and relaxing stopovers at jewel-like pagodas and tea houses. Then an afternoon bus trip to Shanghai.
Sightseeing the next day included the Yu Garden, a maze of marvelous pavilions, ponds, rocky works and overarching trees. There was also a visit to the Bund, a famous waterfront park, and a business visit to the Pudong Economic Development Zone.
The final hours in China were spent at the discretion of each tourist before the flight home from Shanghai to Los Angeles.
“The food at the 5-Star Hotels was great,” added Kienast. “We ate out noons and evenings and some of it was unusual, but pretty good.”
“We ate a lot of rice, tea and soup, but there were  McDonalds there and Kentucky Fried Chicken, too.”
Kineast said one thing that amazed him was the unique way with which China controls its swarming traffic. Vehicles are allowed on the roads on certain days according to the number on their license plate.
He said relationships with the United States are generally pretty good except for some human rights and trade issues.
There was good quality beer on the trip, but Chinese liquor is very strong.
“It was a lot of fun,” Kienast. “Very enjoyable, very educational - the trip of a lifetime.”




 








 

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